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2006-12-29
Mos Grigore din Chicago (...@worldnet.att.net, IP: 208.207.43...)
2006-12-29 18:27
Suedia Raiul Islamului in Europa............................

Sweden keeps doors open to immigrants

By KARL RITTER, Associated Press Writer
Thu Dec 28, 3:18 AM ET



While Sweden is receiving immigrants in record numbers, few voices are calling for closing the borders. It's somewhat of an anomaly in today's Europe.

The waves of anti-immigration sentiment that have washed across many European countries seem to have fizzled somewhere over the Baltic Sea.

To be sure, a small far-right party has been making advances and there are growing concerns over failing integration of minorities. But so far, surveys show attitudes toward immigrants remain remarkably positive, and the new center-right government says it has no immediate plans to stem the tide of newcomers.

"I think it is good that Sweden sets itself apart from other countries on this point," Migration Minister Tobias Billstrom said. "A high level (of immigration) is not a problem per se. The problem is to get people to work."

The EU's Eurobarometer survey released last week showed Swedes had the most positive attitudes toward immigrants in the bloc, with 77 percent saying they contribute a lot to society. In Germany only 30 percent agreed. The EU average was 40 percent.

"Compared to many other countries in the EU, Sweden is less xenophobic," said Anders Lange, a Stockholm University researcher who surveys attitudes toward immigration.

He warned, however, that Sweden was seeing the same problems with integration experienced by European countries. Immigrants have a harder time finding good jobs and housing, fueling bitterness and anger.

The national statistics office last week said immigration would reach the highest level ever in 2006, led by Iraqis fleeing the violence in their homeland and Poles looking for work. An estimated 81,000 foreign nationals moved to Sweden this year, up 58 percent from the year before.

The influx, which helped push the population beyond 9.1 million, was mainly due to a temporary law that allowed thousands of asylum-seekers to stay in Sweden even though they had previously been denied residency permits, the agency said.

Immigration authorities said more than 21,000 people had applied for asylum in Sweden by November, compared to some 17,500 last year. The pressure on case workers is mounting.

"It's been a very tough year," Migration Board spokeswoman Marie Andersson said.

Billstrom called for "vigilance" to make sure the system can handle the immigration flow, but added the government has no plans to alter asylum policies that saw the number of Iraqi immigrants more than triple this year.

"The policy we have is based on the need for protection. The government has no reason to change that legislation," he told The Associated Press.

While many European Union countries have clamped down on immigration, Sweden, where about 12 percent of residents are foreign-born, has kept its borders relatively open.

It was one of three EU countries to allow unrestricted access to workers from the 10 new member states that joined in 2004. It plans no restrictions on Romanians and Bulgarians when they become EU citizens on Jan. 1.

Sweden's approach contrasts with immigration restrictions seen in many other EU countries such as Denmark and the Netherlands.

Dutch immigration authorities said about 73,000 people had applied for residency permits by the end of November, compared to 99,000 in 2005 and 126,000 in 2004.

In Denmark, the number of asylum-seekers has dwindled since stricter laws were introduced four years ago, from more than 6,000 in 2002 to some 1,500 in the first 10 months of this year, according to the Danish Immigration Service.

Both countries, previously known for being among the most welcoming nations to immigrants, have seen attitudes harden.

Sweden's far-right says the country will be forced to cut immigration sharply.

"This is not a reasonable level because we already have very big difficulties integrating the people who are already here," said Jonas Akerlund of the Sweden Democrats, a party with roots in an extreme-right movement in the 1980s. The party, which doubled its support in September elections, is not represented in Parliament but has more than 200 seats on local councils, mostly in southern Sweden.

"We have for a long time had an immigration that is sharply different from our neighboring countries. It's a bigger task than we can handle," Akerlund said.

However, the party's rise did not worry Abdel Kader, a Muslim immigrant from Morocco, who said immigrants are generally "well-received" in Sweden.

"It's normal that groups like that exist, but I don't think they will grow in Sweden because people feel safe here," he said. "The way you are treated (here) let's you relax so that you can live your life normally."

___

Associated Press reporters Jan Olsen in Copenhagen, Denmark, Louise Nordstrom in Stockholm, Sweden, and Mike Corder in the Hague, Netherlands, contributed to this report.

CALUGARUL din usa (...@yahoo.com, IP: 208.4.152...)
2006-12-29 19:30
Mielule, mai bine inmoaie-tzi punga de 150 de parai shi lasa-ne. Fii shi tu o data om, nuuuu...

La 2006-12-29 18:27:50, Mos Grigore a scris:

> Sweden keeps doors open to immigrants
>
> By KARL RITTER, Associated Press Writer
> Thu Dec 28, 3:18 AM ET
>
>
>
> While Sweden is receiving immigrants in record numbers, few voices are
> calling for closing the borders. It's somewhat of an anomaly in
> today's Europe.
>
> The waves of anti-immigration sentiment that have washed across many
> European countries seem to have fizzled somewhere over the Baltic
> Sea.
>
> To be sure, a small far-right party has been making advances and there
> are growing concerns over failing integration of minorities. But so
> far, surveys show attitudes toward immigrants remain remarkably
> positive, and the new center-right government says it has no immediate
> plans to stem the tide of newcomers.
>
> "I think it is good that Sweden sets itself apart from other countries
> on this point," Migration Minister Tobias Billstrom said. "A high
> level (of immigration) is not a problem per se. The problem is to get
> people to work."
>
> The EU's Eurobarometer survey released last week showed Swedes had the
> most positive attitudes toward immigrants in the bloc, with 77 percent
> saying they contribute a lot to society. In Germany only 30 percent
> agreed. The EU average was 40 percent.
>
> "Compared to many other countries in the EU, Sweden is less
> xenophobic," said Anders Lange, a Stockholm University researcher who
> surveys attitudes toward immigration.
>
> He warned, however, that Sweden was seeing the same problems with
> integration experienced by European countries. Immigrants have a
> harder time finding good jobs and housing, fueling bitterness and
> anger.
>
> The national statistics office last week said immigration would reach
> the highest level ever in 2006, led by Iraqis fleeing the violence in
> their homeland and Poles looking for work. An estimated 81,000 foreign
> nationals moved to Sweden this year, up 58 percent from the year
> before.
>
> The influx, which helped push the population beyond 9.1 million, was
> mainly due to a temporary law that allowed thousands of asylum-seekers
> to stay in Sweden even though they had previously been denied
> residency permits, the agency said.
>
> Immigration authorities said more than 21,000 people had applied for
> asylum in Sweden by November, compared to some 17,500 last year. The
> pressure on case workers is mounting.
>
> "It's been a very tough year," Migration Board spokeswoman Marie
> Andersson said.
>
> Billstrom called for "vigilance" to make sure the system can handle
> the immigration flow, but added the government has no plans to alter
> asylum policies that saw the number of Iraqi immigrants more than
> triple this year.
>
> "The policy we have is based on the need for protection. The
> government has no reason to change that legislation," he told The
> Associated Press.
>
> While many European Union countries have clamped down on immigration,
> Sweden, where about 12 percent of residents are foreign-born, has kept
> its borders relatively open.
>
> It was one of three EU countries to allow unrestricted access to
> workers from the 10 new member states that joined in 2004. It plans no
> restrictions on Romanians and Bulgarians when they become EU citizens
> on Jan. 1.
>
> Sweden's approach contrasts with immigration restrictions seen in many
> other EU countries such as Denmark and the Netherlands.
>
> Dutch immigration authorities said about 73,000 people had applied for
> residency permits by the end of November, compared to 99,000 in 2005
> and 126,000 in 2004.
>
> In Denmark, the number of asylum-seekers has dwindled since stricter
> laws were introduced four years ago, from more than 6,000 in 2002 to
> some 1,500 in the first 10 months of this year, according to the
> Danish Immigration Service.
>
> Both countries, previously known for being among the most welcoming
> nations to immigrants, have seen attitudes harden.
>
> Sweden's far-right says the country will be forced to cut immigration
> sharply.
>
> "This is not a reasonable level because we already have very big
> difficulties integrating the people who are already here," said Jonas
> Akerlund of the Sweden Democrats, a party with roots in an
> extreme-right movement in the 1980s. The party, which doubled its
> support in September elections, is not represented in Parliament but
> has more than 200 seats on local councils, mostly in southern Sweden.
>
>
> "We have for a long time had an immigration that is sharply different
> from our neighboring countries. It's a bigger task than we can
> handle," Akerlund said.
>
> However, the party's rise did not worry Abdel Kader, a Muslim
> immigrant from Morocco, who said immigrants are generally
> "well-received" in Sweden.
>
> "It's normal that groups like that exist, but I don't think they will
> grow in Sweden because people feel safe here," he said. "The way you
> are treated (here) let's you relax so that you can live your life
> normally."
>
> ___
>
> Associated Press reporters Jan Olsen in Copenhagen, Denmark, Louise
> Nordstrom in Stockholm, Sweden, and Mike Corder in the Hague,
> Netherlands, contributed to this report.
>
>
>

Nikon din Romania (...@yahoo.com, IP: 87.69.45...)
2006-12-29 19:34
Re: Suedia Raiul Islamului in Europa............................

La 2006-12-29 18:27:50, Mos Grigore a scris:

> Sweden keeps doors open to immigrants
>
> By KARL RITTER, Associated Press Writer
> Thu Dec 28, 3:18 AM ET

Moshule,
Pai de asta Katty a noastra e atat de rashpa si ii indrageste si ii apara...
Pai tot ea e cea mai activa pe subiectele cu evrei,Israel,America.
Diagnosticul e simplu :Sub masca se ascunde Islamul,bine ca barbatu ei nu stie romaneste ca i-ar taia moatele..........



>
>
>
> While Sweden is receiving immigrants in record numbers, few voices are
> calling for closing the borders. It's somewhat of an anomaly in
> today's Europe.
>
> The waves of anti-immigration sentiment that have washed across many
> European countries seem to have fizzled somewhere over the Baltic
> Sea.
>
> To be sure, a small far-right party has been making advances and there
> are growing concerns over failing integration of minorities. But so
> far, surveys show attitudes toward immigrants remain remarkably
> positive, and the new center-right government says it has no immediate
> plans to stem the tide of newcomers.
>
> "I think it is good that Sweden sets itself apart from other countries
> on this point," Migration Minister Tobias Billstrom said. "A high
> level (of immigration) is not a problem per se. The problem is to get
> people to work."
>
> The EU's Eurobarometer survey released last week showed Swedes had the
> most positive attitudes toward immigrants in the bloc, with 77 percent
> saying they contribute a lot to society. In Germany only 30 percent
> agreed. The EU average was 40 percent.
>
> "Compared to many other countries in the EU, Sweden is less
> xenophobic," said Anders Lange, a Stockholm University researcher who
> surveys attitudes toward immigration.
>
> He warned, however, that Sweden was seeing the same problems with
> integration experienced by European countries. Immigrants have a
> harder time finding good jobs and housing, fueling bitterness and
> anger.
>
> The national statistics office last week said immigration would reach
> the highest level ever in 2006, led by Iraqis fleeing the violence in
> their homeland and Poles looking for work. An estimated 81,000 foreign
> nationals moved to Sweden this year, up 58 percent from the year
> before.
>
> The influx, which helped push the population beyond 9.1 million, was
> mainly due to a temporary law that allowed thousands of asylum-seekers
> to stay in Sweden even though they had previously been denied
> residency permits, the agency said.
>
> Immigration authorities said more than 21,000 people had applied for
> asylum in Sweden by November, compared to some 17,500 last year. The
> pressure on case workers is mounting.
>
> "It's been a very tough year," Migration Board spokeswoman Marie
> Andersson said.
>
> Billstrom called for "vigilance" to make sure the system can handle
> the immigration flow, but added the government has no plans to alter
> asylum policies that saw the number of Iraqi immigrants more than
> triple this year.
>
> "The policy we have is based on the need for protection. The
> government has no reason to change that legislation," he told The
> Associated Press.
>
> While many European Union countries have clamped down on immigration,
> Sweden, where about 12 percent of residents are foreign-born, has kept
> its borders relatively open.
>
> It was one of three EU countries to allow unrestricted access to
> workers from the 10 new member states that joined in 2004. It plans no
> restrictions on Romanians and Bulgarians when they become EU citizens
> on Jan. 1.
>
> Sweden's approach contrasts with immigration restrictions seen in many
> other EU countries such as Denmark and the Netherlands.
>
> Dutch immigration authorities said about 73,000 people had applied for
> residency permits by the end of November, compared to 99,000 in 2005
> and 126,000 in 2004.
>
> In Denmark, the number of asylum-seekers has dwindled since stricter
> laws were introduced four years ago, from more than 6,000 in 2002 to
> some 1,500 in the first 10 months of this year, according to the
> Danish Immigration Service.
>
> Both countries, previously known for being among the most welcoming
> nations to immigrants, have seen attitudes harden.
>
> Sweden's far-right says the country will be forced to cut immigration
> sharply.
>
> "This is not a reasonable level because we already have very big
> difficulties integrating the people who are already here," said Jonas
> Akerlund of the Sweden Democrats, a party with roots in an
> extreme-right movement in the 1980s. The party, which doubled its
> support in September elections, is not represented in Parliament but
> has more than 200 seats on local councils, mostly in southern Sweden.
>
>
> "We have for a long time had an immigration that is sharply different
> from our neighboring countries. It's a bigger task than we can
> handle," Akerlund said.
>
> However, the party's rise did not worry Abdel Kader, a Muslim
> immigrant from Morocco, who said immigrants are generally
> "well-received" in Sweden.
>
> "It's normal that groups like that exist, but I don't think they will
> grow in Sweden because people feel safe here," he said. "The way you
> are treated (here) let's you relax so that you can live your life
> normally."
>
> ___
>
> Associated Press reporters Jan Olsen in Copenhagen, Denmark, Louise
> Nordstrom in Stockholm, Sweden, and Mike Corder in the Hague,
> Netherlands, contributed to this report.
>
>
>

Mos Grigore din Chicago (...@worldnet.att.net, IP: 208.207.43...)
2006-12-29 20:02
Ce patzisi Calugare iar ti-ai scapt Psaltirea in Hazna si ai DRACI?

La 2006-12-29 19:30:19, CALUGARUL a scris:

> La 2006-12-29 18:27:50, Mos Grigore a scris:
>
> > Sweden keeps doors open to immigrants
> >
> > By KARL RITTER, Associated Press Writer
> > Thu Dec 28, 3:18 AM ET
> >
> >
> >
> > While Sweden is receiving immigrants in record numbers, few voices are
> > calling for closing the borders. It's somewhat of an anomaly in
> > today's Europe.
> >
> > The waves of anti-immigration sentiment that have washed across many
> > European countries seem to have fizzled somewhere over the Baltic
> > Sea.
> >
> > To be sure, a small far-right party has been making advances and there
> > are growing concerns over failing integration of minorities. But so
> > far, surveys show attitudes toward immigrants remain remarkably
> > positive, and the new center-right government says it has no immediate
> > plans to stem the tide of newcomers.
> >
> > "I think it is good that Sweden sets itself apart from other countries
> > on this point," Migration Minister Tobias Billstrom said. "A high
> > level (of immigration) is not a problem per se. The problem is to get
> > people to work."
> >
> > The EU's Eurobarometer survey released last week showed Swedes had the
> > most positive attitudes toward immigrants in the bloc, with 77 percent
> > saying they contribute a lot to society. In Germany only 30 percent
> > agreed. The EU average was 40 percent.
> >
> > "Compared to many other countries in the EU, Sweden is less
> > xenophobic," said Anders Lange, a Stockholm University researcher who
> > surveys attitudes toward immigration.
> >
> > He warned, however, that Sweden was seeing the same problems with
> > integration experienced by European countries. Immigrants have a
> > harder time finding good jobs and housing, fueling bitterness and
> > anger.
> >
> > The national statistics office last week said immigration would reach
> > the highest level ever in 2006, led by Iraqis fleeing the violence in
> > their homeland and Poles looking for work. An estimated 81,000 foreign
> > nationals moved to Sweden this year, up 58 percent from the year
> > before.
> >
> > The influx, which helped push the population beyond 9.1 million, was
> > mainly due to a temporary law that allowed thousands of asylum-seekers
> > to stay in Sweden even though they had previously been denied
> > residency permits, the agency said.
> >
> > Immigration authorities said more than 21,000 people had applied for
> > asylum in Sweden by November, compared to some 17,500 last year. The
> > pressure on case workers is mounting.
> >
> > "It's been a very tough year," Migration Board spokeswoman Marie
> > Andersson said.
> >
> > Billstrom called for "vigilance" to make sure the system can handle
> > the immigration flow, but added the government has no plans to alter
> > asylum policies that saw the number of Iraqi immigrants more than
> > triple this year.
> >
> > "The policy we have is based on the need for protection. The
> > government has no reason to change that legislation," he told The
> > Associated Press.
> >
> > While many European Union countries have clamped down on immigration,
> > Sweden, where about 12 percent of residents are foreign-born, has kept
> > its borders relatively open.
> >
> > It was one of three EU countries to allow unrestricted access to
> > workers from the 10 new member states that joined in 2004. It plans no
> > restrictions on Romanians and Bulgarians when they become EU citizens
> > on Jan. 1.
> >
> > Sweden's approach contrasts with immigration restrictions seen in many
> > other EU countries such as Denmark and the Netherlands.
> >
> > Dutch immigration authorities said about 73,000 people had applied for
> > residency permits by the end of November, compared to 99,000 in 2005
> > and 126,000 in 2004.
> >
> > In Denmark, the number of asylum-seekers has dwindled since stricter
> > laws were introduced four years ago, from more than 6,000 in 2002 to
> > some 1,500 in the first 10 months of this year, according to the
> > Danish Immigration Service.
> >
> > Both countries, previously known for being among the most welcoming
> > nations to immigrants, have seen attitudes harden.
> >
> > Sweden's far-right says the country will be forced to cut immigration
> > sharply.
> >
> > "This is not a reasonable level because we already have very big
> > difficulties integrating the people who are already here," said Jonas
> > Akerlund of the Sweden Democrats, a party with roots in an
> > extreme-right movement in the 1980s. The party, which doubled its
> > support in September elections, is not represented in Parliament but
> > has more than 200 seats on local councils, mostly in southern Sweden.
> >
> >
> > "We have for a long time had an immigration that is sharply different
> > from our neighboring countries. It's a bigger task than we can
> > handle," Akerlund said.
> >
> > However, the party's rise did not worry Abdel Kader, a Muslim
> > immigrant from Morocco, who said immigrants are generally
> > "well-received" in Sweden.
> >
> > "It's normal that groups like that exist, but I don't think they will
> > grow in Sweden because people feel safe here," he said. "The way you
> > are treated (here) let's you relax so that you can live your life
> > normally."
> >
> > ___
> >
> > Associated Press reporters Jan Olsen in Copenhagen, Denmark, Louise
> > Nordstrom in Stockholm, Sweden, and Mike Corder in the Hague,
> > Netherlands, contributed to this report.
> >
> >
> >
>
>

Mos Grigore din Chicago (...@worldnet.att.net, IP: 208.207.43...)
2006-12-29 20:04
Re: Suedia Raiul Islamului in Europa............................

La 2006-12-29 19:34:12, Nikon a scris:

> Moshule,
> Pai de asta Katty a noastra e atat de rashpa si ii indrageste si ii
> apara...
> Pai tot ea e cea mai activa pe subiectele cu evrei,Israel,America.
> Diagnosticul e simplu :Sub masca se ascunde Islamul,bine ca barbatu ei
> nu stie romaneste ca i-ar taia moatele..........
=====================================================

Pai tocmai ala e Islamicuuuu...........ea doarme cu Kapra!
>
>
> >
> >
> >
> > While Sweden is receiving immigrants in record numbers, few voices are
> > calling for closing the borders. It's somewhat of an anomaly in
> > today's Europe.
> >
> > The waves of anti-immigration sentiment that have washed across many
> > European countries seem to have fizzled somewhere over the Baltic
> > Sea.
> >
> > To be sure, a small far-right party has been making advances and there
> > are growing concerns over failing integration of minorities. But so
> > far, surveys show attitudes toward immigrants remain remarkably
> > positive, and the new center-right government says it has no immediate
> > plans to stem the tide of newcomers.
> >
> > "I think it is good that Sweden sets itself apart from other countries
> > on this point," Migration Minister Tobias Billstrom said. "A high
> > level (of immigration) is not a problem per se. The problem is to get
> > people to work."
> >
> > The EU's Eurobarometer survey released last week showed Swedes had the
> > most positive attitudes toward immigrants in the bloc, with 77 percent
> > saying they contribute a lot to society. In Germany only 30 percent
> > agreed. The EU average was 40 percent.
> >
> > "Compared to many other countries in the EU, Sweden is less
> > xenophobic," said Anders Lange, a Stockholm University researcher who
> > surveys attitudes toward immigration.
> >
> > He warned, however, that Sweden was seeing the same problems with
> > integration experienced by European countries. Immigrants have a
> > harder time finding good jobs and housing, fueling bitterness and
> > anger.
> >
> > The national statistics office last week said immigration would reach
> > the highest level ever in 2006, led by Iraqis fleeing the violence in
> > their homeland and Poles looking for work. An estimated 81,000 foreign
> > nationals moved to Sweden this year, up 58 percent from the year
> > before.
> >
> > The influx, which helped push the population beyond 9.1 million, was
> > mainly due to a temporary law that allowed thousands of asylum-seekers
> > to stay in Sweden even though they had previously been denied
> > residency permits, the agency said.
> >
> > Immigration authorities said more than 21,000 people had applied for
> > asylum in Sweden by November, compared to some 17,500 last year. The
> > pressure on case workers is mounting.
> >
> > "It's been a very tough year," Migration Board spokeswoman Marie
> > Andersson said.
> >
> > Billstrom called for "vigilance" to make sure the system can handle
> > the immigration flow, but added the government has no plans to alter
> > asylum policies that saw the number of Iraqi immigrants more than
> > triple this year.
> >
> > "The policy we have is based on the need for protection. The
> > government has no reason to change that legislation," he told The
> > Associated Press.
> >
> > While many European Union countries have clamped down on immigration,
> > Sweden, where about 12 percent of residents are foreign-born, has kept
> > its borders relatively open.
> >
> > It was one of three EU countries to allow unrestricted access to
> > workers from the 10 new member states that joined in 2004. It plans no
> > restrictions on Romanians and Bulgarians when they become EU citizens
> > on Jan. 1.
> >
> > Sweden's approach contrasts with immigration restrictions seen in many
> > other EU countries such as Denmark and the Netherlands.
> >
> > Dutch immigration authorities said about 73,000 people had applied for
> > residency permits by the end of November, compared to 99,000 in 2005
> > and 126,000 in 2004.
> >
> > In Denmark, the number of asylum-seekers has dwindled since stricter
> > laws were introduced four years ago, from more than 6,000 in 2002 to
> > some 1,500 in the first 10 months of this year, according to the
> > Danish Immigration Service.
> >
> > Both countries, previously known for being among the most welcoming
> > nations to immigrants, have seen attitudes harden.
> >
> > Sweden's far-right says the country will be forced to cut immigration
> > sharply.
> >
> > "This is not a reasonable level because we already have very big
> > difficulties integrating the people who are already here," said Jonas
> > Akerlund of the Sweden Democrats, a party with roots in an
> > extreme-right movement in the 1980s. The party, which doubled its
> > support in September elections, is not represented in Parliament but
> > has more than 200 seats on local councils, mostly in southern Sweden.
> >
> >
> > "We have for a long time had an immigration that is sharply different
> > from our neighboring countries. It's a bigger task than we can
> > handle," Akerlund said.
> >
> > However, the party's rise did not worry Abdel Kader, a Muslim
> > immigrant from Morocco, who said immigrants are generally
> > "well-received" in Sweden.
> >
> > "It's normal that groups like that exist, but I don't think they will
> > grow in Sweden because people feel safe here," he said. "The way you
> > are treated (here) let's you relax so that you can live your life
> > normally."
> >
> > ___
> >
> > Associated Press reporters Jan Olsen in Copenhagen, Denmark, Louise
> > Nordstrom in Stockholm, Sweden, and Mike Corder in the Hague,
> > Netherlands, contributed to this report.
> >
> >
> >
>
>

CALUGARUL din usa (...@yahoo.com, IP: 208.4.152...)
2006-12-29 20:10
Re: Suedia Raiul Islamului in Europa............................

La 2006-12-29 19:34:12, Nikon a scris:

bine ca barbatu ei nu stie romaneste ca i-ar taia moatele..........


__________


Aiurea, nene Nikonule. Habar n-ai ce vorbeshti. Cum sa-i rupa moatzele barbat-su', cind iel ie de un metru shaishunu iar ea e de un metru obzeshdoi ? Iel are cinze'shnoua de kile imbracat, iar ea, fara pijama shi celelalte subansamble are noushase de kile ? Pai, barbat-su nu sufla in fatza iei. Pai matale shtii ca in timp ce ea scrie la compiuter el ii face masaj ? Pai shtii cind a venit politzia la ei acasa ca i-au cehmat vecinii ca-l batuse mar pe barbat-su ? Cum adica pentru care motiv ? De ce l-a batut pe barbat-su' ? Pai cum sa nu-l bata, domnule ?, cind ea, saraca, s-a saturat sa fie ea barbatu' ? A ? Ai preceput ?

Katty din Vxj Suedia (...@home.com, IP: 83.254.193...)
2006-12-29 20:50
Re: Suedia Raiul Islamului in Europa............................



Mosule, una spune articolul si una gindesti dumneata. Numai la islamisti iti este gindul ! Suedia, asa cum este mentionat in articol, este una din putinele tari din UE care intelege sa nu limiteze dreptul de munca a cetatenilor din cele doua tari nou intrate in UE. Ai auzit bine ? A cetatenilor din cele doua tari nou intrate in UE , adica Romania si Bulgaria. Ce are asta cu raiul islamist de care vorbesti dumneata pina la obsesie? Romanii ar trebui sa fie bucurosi ca mai exista si tari in UE care inteleg spiritul european declarat in documentele europene , dar neaplicat de multe tari sau aplicat discrimnatoriu. O familie tanara cu copii , care isi gaseste contract de munca in Suedia se va putea stabili si lucra in Suedia si asta nu poate fi decit imbucurator pentru romani. Singurul inconvenient este limba care nu este nici usoara sau apropiata de romana precum spaniola si italiana si nici de circulatie internationala precum engleza, franceza si germana. In meserii precum medici, asistente medicale , profesori cunoasterea limbii suedeze este o necesitate. Mai usor va fi pentru ingineri si cercetatori care vor putea folosi , cel putin la inceput, limba engleza. Cu toate astea numerosi medici si dentisti din Polonia s-au putut stabili in Suedia datorita faptului ca este mare nevoie de medici in Suedia. De ce ? Pentru ca multi medici suedezi, mai ales din zonele de granita cu Norvegia, au plecat acolo pe motiv de salarii mai mari.

Asa ca mai incet cu dezinformarea mosule !!!

Katty din Vxj Suedia (...@home.com, IP: 83.254.193...)
2006-12-29 21:05
Re: Suedia Raiul Islamului in Europa............................



Si inca o informatie utila pentru romanii doritori sa lucreze in Europa. Suedia va recunoaste conform acordului incheiat de Romania cu UE si diplomele de invatamant superior. Asa ca incercati sa ramaneti in UE si nu mai plecati peste ocean ca sa o luati acolo de la inceput. Cunosc familii in Canada in care ambii soti cu diplome de medici si ingineri si cu masterate in Belgia si Franta si care de ani de zile tot mai invata ca sa-si echivaleze studiile din Europa. Nu mai vorbesc de avantajul ramanerii in Europa , mai aproape de casa, cu concedii care sa permita sa-ti vizitezi tara mai des.

Oriana din http://www.ziualibera.blogspot.com/ (...@hotmail.it, IP: 62.101.126...)
2006-12-29 21:28
Suedia Raiul Islamului in Europa....

La 2006-12-29 20:50:31, Katty a scris:

Mosule, una spune articolul si una gindesti dumneata. Numai la islamisti iti este gindul !

Asa ca mai incet cu dezinformarea mosule !!!
----------------
Art. citat e "oglinda" actuala a Suediei, nu e vorba de romani-bulgari, care nu-s islamici, deci nimeni nu ar avea nimic impotriva sa plece in orice tara UE, unde in curand vor fi ca acasa. Din cate aud si citesc, parazitii privilegaza Suedia.

Situatia islamicilor din Suedia e arhicunoscuta, curios ca tu nu esti la curent, or ca preferi s-o faci pe strutoaica, pana o sa fie prea tarziu.

La ce stadiu a ajuns faimoasa moschee din Vaxjo, si inca o intrebare, cate BISERICI s-au constiut in Suedia, in ultimii, sa zicem 15 ani, concomitent cu imigratia asta masiva islamica ?



Katty din Vxj Suedia (...@home.com, IP: 83.254.193...)
2006-12-29 22:17
Re: Suedia Raiul Islamului in Europa....

La 2006-12-29 21:28:42, Oriana a scris:

> La 2006-12-29 20:50:31, Katty a scris:
>
> Mosule, una spune articolul si una gindesti dumneata. Numai la
> islamisti iti este gindul !
>
> Asa ca mai incet cu dezinformarea mosule !!!
> ----------------
> Art. citat e "oglinda" actuala a Suediei, nu e vorba de
> romani-bulgari, care nu-s islamici, deci nimeni nu ar avea nimic
> impotriva sa plece in orice tara UE, unde in curand vor fi ca acasa.
> Din cate aud si citesc, parazitii privilegaza Suedia.
>
> Situatia islamicilor din Suedia e arhicunoscuta, curios ca tu nu esti
> la curent, or ca preferi s-o faci pe strutoaica, pana o sa fie prea
> tarziu.
>
> La ce stadiu a ajuns faimoasa moschee din Vaxjo, si inca o intrebare,
> cate BISERICI s-au constiut in Suedia, in ultimii, sa zicem 15 ani,
> concomitent cu imigratia asta masiva islamica ?
>


Iar te dai specialista in tari unde nu traiesti ? Afla ca s-au construit multe biserici in Suedia. Si de unde inainte nu aveam biserica ortodoxa in Vxj , iar preotul din Malm era nevoit sa vina o data pe luna in Vxj sau le cerere in caz de nunti, botezuri sau inmormantari, acum avem si noi biserica ortodoxa. Asa ca nu mai dezinforma lumea cu ce stii tu despre Suedia.

Iar in articol nu se precizeaza nimic despre islam. Comentariile si titlul reprezinta obsesiile mosului si ale tale.


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